Friday, January 30, 2015

Boeing to curtail 787 surge line final assembly activities later this fall

According to analysis of final assembly activities for the 787, Boeing is planning to shift final assembly of some 787s currently being built on the surge line (in 40-24) to the main final assembly line in Everett and the North Charleston line.  Currently, Boeing assembling 4 787s/month on the main line in 40-26, 3/month on the surge line in 40-24 and 3/month on the North Charleston line in 88-30.

Around October, Boeing will reduce the number of 787 airplanes assembled on the surge line by 2 aircraft/month and reallocate 1/month each to 40-26 and the North Charleston line.  40-26 will assemble 5/month and North Charleston will assemble 4/month while the surge will still assemble 1/month.  It has been Boeing's plan to use the surge line as a temporary line while they got the North Charleston line up and running and increasing the production rate from 3/month to 10/month.

I believe Boeing has enough confidence in the North Charleston facility to to increase its production rate early.  Boeing is supposed to increase the North Charleston rate to 5/month in 2016 but it appears this may happen sooner than expected.  I do believe that in 2016 Boeing will shut down the 787 surge line reallocate the lone aircraft on that line to 40-26 and then when they ready to up the rate to 12/month, assign 1 each to 40-26 and 88-30.

The surge line is planned to be used for final assembly of the initial batch of 777X.

6 comments:

ce said...

Boeing getting comfy... Look at the stock price popping yesterday and the day before... had to be institutional buying if you pay attention to the volume.

A significant piece of news today is ANA buying (into) the -10:

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/boeing-announces-anas-commitment-to-become-newest-787-10-customer-300028383.html

Three units. But follow-up orders are most certainly to come in the coming years for the type to be part of their fleet strategy.

larmeyers said...

Uresh, perhaps you or someone knows the answer to this question about the early build airframes. If a new customer desires, can they be switched between GE and RR engines, or do they have to be fitted with the same engine they were built for? thanks in advance...

Uresh said...

As far as I know the 787 was designed with a common engine pylon that would accept both engines. That was the one marketing point that Boeing pushed especially with lessors. As far as I know any 787 should be able to accept either engine.

Mcass777 said...

I know this is a crazy one-off scenario, but if a RR 787 needed an engine in a city where only a GE engine was available could they install it and fly away?

Randy Austin said...

No. Engine intermix manufacturer to manufacturer was not certified to my knowledge.

CharlieFox said...

Wouldn't be possible due to engine indication differences anyhow