Tuesday, September 11, 2018

787 Month End report: August 2018; Deliveries Remain Lackluster in August


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Number
Testing Complete3
To be assembled in Everett69
To be assembled in Charleston63
Parts Arriving6
Undergoing final assembly9
Storage2
Storage/Change Incorporation and Re-Work0
Change Incorporation and Re-Work2
Pre-Flight Prep11
Production Testing6
Non Customer Flight Tests0
Ready for Delivery4
Donation3
Delivered724
TOTAL902

787 deliveries for August continued to be subdued as Boeing only turned over 8 airplanes. This is the same as July as Boeing continued to be plagued by supplier issues as well as an apparent finance issues with Hainan Airlines which has also added to the 787 delivery woes.

Boeing delivered 7 787-9 and 1 787-8 which was Biman Bangladesh's first 787.  Through August Boeing has delivered 88 787s which is a delivery rate of 11/month.  If they are to deliver 787s at the same rate as they're producing which is currently 12/month they would need to average 14 deliveries per month for the remainder of the year.  It's something that is achievable. but Boeing will need to overcome the supplier issue as well as the financing issues that are creating the delivery bottleneck.

So far this month, Boeing has delivered one 787 but I am unsure of the delivery schedule for the remainder of the month.  Again a number of 787s for Hainan appear to be ready for delivery but no word on delivery dates as of yet.

Boeing seems to be preparing to start deliveries of GE powered 787-10 as one each for United Airlines and Etihad Airways are painted and have flown.  It's possible that deliveries could start this month but more likely they will start in October.

In terms of orders Boeing added 3 787-9s to their order book in August.  They're for Air Lease Corporation. Boeing also re-booked 5 787-9s that were for Hawaiian Airlines to Boeing Capital Corp.  It seems that Hawaiian will be leasing those 5 from BCC.  Boeing's order book now stands at 1,390.






787s heading to Everett earlier today.  Flightaware

With hurricane Florence threatening the Carolinas, Boeing Charleston is shutting down.  Starting last last night and continuing today, Boeing sent 6 Dreamliners from Charleston to Everett as well as one Dreamlifter. There are still 11 completed 787s left at Charleston and I can only surmise that these airframes will ride out the storm in 88-30 (if they can fit them all in there) or perhaps in the paint hangars. The storm is expected to hit the Carolina coast around Thursday/Friday.  No doubt 787 deliveries will be affected by this storm and will only add to the 787 delivery issues.  I don't believe that the aircraft flown to Everett could be delivered from there unless they are 100% ready but it is possible.

Lastly, I want to wish my readers in the Carolina's good luck and to stay safe.  My thoughts and prayers are for their safety and that of their families.

787 Spreadsheets

9 comments:

John Simms said...

I'm wondering if the rumors of Emirates/Etihad merger have anything to do with Emirates delay in finalizing the 787-10 order what with the possibility of taking over Etihad orders and receiving a faster delivery.

Uresh said...

Good question, if they do merge there's going to be some overlap of routes but I think the combined Etihad/Emirates entity could beneft from more 787-10s thus I think EK will still go ahead with the purchase.

Fred Ransome said...

Uresh, do you know if the Charleston facility sustained any damage from hurricane Florence? Has Charleston resumed production of body sections, assembly or flight testing?

Uresh said...

I haven't heard about any damage but I don't think there is any. They resumed full operations on Sept. 16th.

John Simms said...

Is there a possibility that the holdup with Hainan delivery could be the airline working out a sale and lease back program with a lessor?

Uresh said...

It's possible.

agincourt said...

Not many Trent 1000 in the line up!

Christopher D. Dye said...


Launchvehicle71 - Amazing that each of Boeing's two major assembly plants is located in a place where the weather (hurricanes in SC) and earthquakes in Seattle could seriously damage or destroy those factories.

John Simms said...

Don't forget Mount Ranier near Seattle.