Friday, July 31, 2015

Boeing 787 deliveries reach over 300; posts 12 deliveries in July



Over 4 years ago the 787 program was starting to emerge from most of the issues that had plagued the program since 2007. The first delivery was right around the corner to ANA. A little less than 4 years after program deliveries began, a time when Boeing was barely reducing 2 787s each month. Now Boeing has reached 300 deliveries coming from 2 different production facilities running at 10 per month for 2 different models of the 787.  Boeing announced #300 though Randy's Journal, but they won't name the carrier.  It's possible that it was ANA but that is speculation on my part.

Boeing's 300th 787 delivery come amidst a drive to increase the delivery rate in the third quarter.  I'm not sure which airline accepted delivery of number 300 but it is either ANA, United Airlines, Etihad or Air Canada.  Through July 31st Boeing has delivered 304 787s, 76 in 2015 and 12 in the month of July.  The aircraft maker also rolled out 11 787s from its factories; 7 from Everett (including the surge line in 40-24) and 4 from Charleston.  11 787s starting final assembly in July with 5 on the main Everett line in 40-26, 1 going to the surge line in 40-24 and 5 in Charleston.

Production efficiency improved this month, particularly at Everett as 9 Everett 787s were delivered vs, 7 rollouts.  Charleston was hurt because of the delayed delivery of the two Kenya Airways jets.  Their efficiency number was not as good given the 3 deliveries vs. 4 roll outs.  Overall the 787 efficiency was .92 a good number but could have been better if Kenya was ready to take its 2 remaining 787s.

July deliveries would have been higher but for Kenya Airways and PrivatAir deferring the delivery of  3 787-8 which are ready to be handed over.  PrivatAir's delivery now looks to be in August and the two Kenya Airways may be handed over in September.

Looking forward, Boeing is planning for 15 deliveries including the PrivatAir delivery.  6 airplanes slated for August delivery have yet to take their B-1 flights including 2 787s at Charleston.  Only 4 are ready for the August delivery but that will, of course, change over the next couple of weeks.

787 Full Production Table

9 comments:

Traveling Man said...

Thanks for the info Uresh. Any word on when 12, 13 and 14 on your production chart will be ready for delivery to Ethiopian?

Uresh said...

No info on that as of yet. Looks like 2016 in my opinion.

Andrew Boydston said...

On the Marketing scope comes good news. The 787 backlog at the end of 2011 is smaller than the current back log at the end of July 2015. This suggest Boeing is delivering at almost the same rate as it adds orders over this four year span of time. It will be interesting if Airbus can match the four year metric (as a comparison) with its A-350 fragmented family of aircraft.

Basil said...

I have been following Qantas and the new agreement with Pilots..could those later 787-9 with GENX-B be for Qantas? Its the right time for delivery?
Thoughts?

Phil Garnatz said...

EL AL Israel Airlines plans to purchase or lease up to 15 787's, options for 13 more

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/boeing-statement-on-el-al-israel-airlines-intent-to-purchase-787-dreamliners-300124470.html

petera380 said...

Hello, there is a slight error in your Delivered spreadsheet.

For 35314/183 ZA183 you have AerCap listed but 12th ILFC in the comments field. One or other is wrong. If ILFC is correct then the latest AirCap delivered is actually # 25.

Regards,

Uresh said...

AerCap and ILFC are one in the same. AerCap bought
ILFC.

Uresh said...

AerCap and ILFC are one in the same. AerCap bought
ILFC.

4330462c-e338-11e3-9abe-000bcdcb2996 said...

With the 777X program still about two years from production, why do they want to shut down the surge line so early? I know they need to convert the jigs for the new program, but how long does that take? I would still use the surge line to fill some of the backlog at least for another 6-9 months. If they can get another 15 planes out of the surge line while still increasing the production rates in the regular lines, it should drive deliveries and further reduction of costs per plane.