Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Boeing attempts to build and deliver 787-9 in 67 days

Boeing is going to try and build and deliver a 787-9 for Scoot in 67 days.  The aircraft in questions, ZB130 (LN 308, 9V-OJD) started final assembly on March 23 and rolled out on April 22, which was 30 days later, from the main 787 assembly line 40-26 in Everett.  It took its first flight today, May 6 which is 2 weeks after rolling out and is projected to spend 23 days in pre-delivery.

ZB130 still has to be painted that should happen between May 10 and May 15th with delivery occurring on May 29th.  This would be 67 days from the time the aircraft entered final assembly to the time it would be delivered.  Of course this could be derailed if there are maintenance or build issues or if Scoot is not prepared to take delivery for some reason.

If Boeing is able to accomplish this, it would be a milestone event in the 787 program as Boeing has yet to build and deliver a 787 in under 70 days.  The current record is 76 days when Boeing built and delivered a 787 to Arke (owned by TUI Travel) earlier this year.  That aircraft, ZA324 (LN 281, PF-TFM) was built in Everett and spent 38 days in final assembly (40-24 surge line), 24 days in pre-flight testing and paint, and 14 days in pre-delivery.  Boeing would hve more confidence in increasing the production rate as well reaffirm their production methods with the aim of further reducing production costs.  If Boeing can demonstrate faster production and delivery times, it can go a long way to reducing 787 production costs which has been a drain on its earnings,

5 comments:

Andrew Boydston said...

Boeing is concerned with or should be concerned with the 787-9 production execution as it order book will continue to grow much faster than the 787-8 orders. More orders will be coming for the dash 9 sooner rather than later. The under 70 day pacing for the 787-9 is an important milestone for production planning.

John Simms said...

Any idea what the average number of days added on to Charleston production due to the current lack of a paint hanger on site?

Uresh said...

It's all relative. Since CHS doesn't have paint hangars yet (they're being built) Boeing needs to send them away for about 9 to 10 days for painting (including flight to/from) so the time between roll out and first flight is shorter than those in Everett. However, the time between first flight and delivery is longer than Everett due to the need to paint the airplanes during that pre-delivery period.

Uresh said...

It's all relative. Since CHS doesn't have paint hangars yet (they're being built) Boeing needs to send them away for about 9 to 10 days for painting (including flight to/from) so the time between roll out and first flight is shorter than those in Everett. However, the time between first flight and delivery is longer than Everett due to the need to paint the airplanes during that pre-delivery period.

Matt M said...

How does the build to delivery pace compare to the 777?